The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine



 

The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine - 
Facility offers expert diagnosis and treatment

 

The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine helps patients get the quality sleep they need to live a full and active life.

 

The center's unique team approach combines the expertise of neurologists, pulmonologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and other health professionals to diagnose and treat adult sleep problems.

 

Conveniently located in Maryville's Morganton Square, this one-level, handicap-accessible facility offers ample free parking in a well-lighted lot.

 

 

Click on the links below to learn about:

 

The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine

Recognizing a Sleep Problem

How Much Sleep Do You Need?

How Sleep Impacts Health

Restless Leg Syndrome

Sleep Apnea

Chronic Insomia

The ETMG Center of Sleep Medicine Staff

Making an Appointment

Directions

 

 

The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine Services -

Individualized diagnosis and treatment

 

Your quality of life is directly linked to the quality of your sleep. Getting adequate rest helps boost your energy level, outlook and overall health.

 

Lack of restful sleep, on the other hand, can contribute to a host of potentially dangerous health problems including:

• high blood pressure
• depression
• confusion
• lethargy
• obesity

 

The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine helps patients get the quality sleep they need. We offer individualized diagnosis and treatment options tailored to meet each patient's unique situation.

 

The First Step
The first step in treating any sleep problem is to determine what is disrupting sleep. Solving that mystery begins with a thorough examination conducted by the patient's physician. He or she can ascertain if there is a medical issue such as arthritis pain or a sluggish thyroid, which is causing the sleep problem. Treating the medical problem often will resolve the sleep difficulties, eliminating the need to visit The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine.

 


Diagnosing the Problem
If no underlying medical problem is found to be disturbing sleep, then patients may be referred to The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine. Diagnostic approaches vary depending on each patient's situation but typically include:

• an evaluation with a Center for Sleep Medicine physician
• an extensive sleep questionnaire covering the patient's personal medical history and sleep history
• if necessary, a sleep study to collect comprehensive physiologic information including sleep breathing patterns, leg movements and heart rate

Tests for Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) and chronic insomnia also are available.


Finding a Solution
Once a diagnosis is made, treatment depends on the results of the sleep study and may include behavioral and dietary counseling, exercise, positive airway pressure such as a CPAP machine, and/or use of an oral splint called a mandibular repositioning device. Surgery rarely is required. Appropriate medications can be prescribed.

For more information or to schedule an initial appointment, call The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine at 865-380-4021.

 

 

Recognizing a Sleep Problem -
Are you getting the sleep you need?

 

Medical experts estimate that 70 million Americans have sleep problems, half of which are chronic. Unfortunately, most people don't realize that they have a problem or that treatment is available. They believe that they are supposed to feel tired all the time due to busy schedules, and work and life stressors.

 

Before you can get help, you have to realize that something is wrong. Take a look at the list of sleep problem symptoms below. If you are experiencing any of these conditions, The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine can help.

 

Sleep Problem Symptoms
You may have a sleep problem if you:
• constantly feel sleepy
• snore loudly
• wake up sweating or gasping for breath
• have been told that you stop breathing when you sleep
• feel tired all the time
• fall asleep while driving
• fall asleep unintentionally while watching TV or reading
• have difficulty paying attention at work or at school
• have memory problems
• have difficulty controlling your emotions
• often wake up with headaches
• must take naps on most days
• have uncomfortable sensations in your legs that keep you awake
• suffer frequent leg or arm movements during the night
• have vivid nightmares

 

 

How Much Sleep Do You Need? -
Age helps determine ideal amount of sleep


According to the National Sleep Foundation (NSF), most adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep each night for optimum performance, health and safety. People who don't get adequate sleep rack up a sleep debt that can be difficult to "pay back" if it becomes too big.

 

Teens need even more sleep, an estimated eight-and-a-half to nine hours each night. Unfortunately, a teen's internal biological clock is set to stay up late. This makes it difficult for teens to get adequate sleep since most high schools start classes between 7:30 and 8:30 a.m.

 

Children ages 5 to 12 need the greatest amount of sleep. The NSF recommends that children get 10 to 11 hours of sleep each night to stay healthy, maintain a positive outlook, reach their maximum academic potential, and have the energy to exercise and play.

 

And while tractor-trailer operators and other professional drivers are required to meet specific sleep minimums, anyone who drives needs to get adequate sleep to stay safe on the road. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, drowsy drivers cause 56,000 accidents in the United States each year. These accidents injure about 40,000 people and kill another 1,500.

 

 

 

Dr. Fredric M. Radoff

How Sleep Impacts Health -
Quality sleep improves quality of life

 

It's estimated that 70 million Americans have trouble sleeping. While an occasional restless night is more annoying than harmful, chronic sleep deprivation can contribute to a host of potentially dangerous health problems. East Tennessee Medical Group neurologist Dr. Fredric  M. Radoff explains.

 

"The whole body is affected by sleep deprivation," Radoff said. "When you are tired, you don't have as much energy, so you don't exercise as much. That leads to weight gain, which can lead to obesity and associated medical issues. And after four days of sleep deprivation, your blood sugar tends to go up, which can cause diabetes.  From here you get increased risk of heart attack and stroke."

 

Radoff added that people who only get four or less hours of sleep each night often experience headaches and poor memory. They also feel fatigued and less alert. This combination can result in poor erformance in school or at work, and potentially deadly consequences when the sleep-deprived person drives or operates machinery.

 

While effective treatments for common sleep-related conditions such as chronic insomnia, sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome are available, it often is difficult to get people to realize that they actually have a medical problem, Radoff said.

 

"Most of the people don't realize that they have a sleep disorder," he explained. "They think that they are supposed to feel tired because of their hectic schedule, their age or some other factor. It's not until we treat their problem that they understand how good they can feel. I've had people with sleep apnea tell me that I gave them their life back. Getting treatment produces a dramatic change."

 

Effective treatment for sleep deprivation begins with a thorough examination conducted by the patient's physician. He or she can determine if there is something medical taking place, such as arthritis pain or a sluggish thyroid, which is causing the sleep problem. Treating the medical problem often will resolve the sleep difficulties.

 

If no underlying medical problem is found to be disturbing sleep, then patients may be referred to a sleep specialist such as one of the physicians at The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine located in Morganton Square in Maryville. Once a diagnosis is made, treatment may include behavioral and dietary counseling, exercise, positive airway pressure such as a CPAP machine, and/or use of an oral splint called a mandibular repositioning device. Surgery rarely is required.

 

For more information about The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine or to schedule an initial appointment, call 865-380-4021.

 


Restless Leg Syndrome -

What you need to know

 

Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder, which causes unpleasant burning or crawling sensations in the legs when patients lie down or try to relax. In an attempt to relieve the discomfort, the legs move uncontrollably. The combination of the sensations and the leg movements disrupts sleep.

The following Frequently Asked Questions cover basic information about RLS symptoms, risks and treatments. For more information, call The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine at 865-380-4021.

 

What are the symptoms of RLS?

The severity of symptoms varies from uncomfortable to irritating to painful. Symptoms tend to surface late in the day and at night, or during long car drives and other periods of extended inactivity.

 

Common symptoms include:

• an urge to move the legs when lying or sitting down often accompanied by a crawling, tingling, cramping or painful sensation

• stretching, rubbing or bending the legs when lying down to alleviate discomfort; tossing and turning in bed; getting up out of bed and pacing the floor

 

What causes RLS?
In most cases, the cause of RLS is unknown. However, a family history of the condition is seen in approximately 50 percent of such cases. In other patients, RLS appears to be related to the following factors or conditions:
• low iron levels or anemia
• chronic diseases such as kidney failure, diabetes, Parkinson's disease and peripheral neuropathy
• last trimester of pregnancy
• certain anti nausea and anti seizure drugs, and antipsychotic, and cold and allergy medications
• caffeine, alcohol and tobacco use

 

Are there health risks associated with RLS?

While RLS is not life threatening, it does disrupt sleep and relaxation, which causes exhaustion and daytime fatigue. Left untreated, RLS can negatively impact a patient's job, personal relations and activities of daily living. People with RLS often are unable to concentrate, have impaired memory and fail to accomplish assigned tasks.


How is RLS diagnosed?

Diagnosis begins with a thorough examination by the patient's physician. If no underlying medical problem is found to be disturbing sleep, then the specialists at The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine can help. The diagnostic process varies depending on each patient's situation but typically includes an extensive sleep questionnaire covering the patient's personal and medical history. If necessary, a sleep study to collect comprehensive information about sleep and breathing patterns may be conducted in one of the center's private, soundproofed, sleep study bedrooms.


Is there a cure for RLS?

While RLS generally is a lifelong condition for which there is no cure, diagnosing and treating any underlying medical problem can alleviate the symptoms. For those with mild to moderate symptoms, lifestyle changes such as adding moderate exercise to the daily routine or decreasing use of caffeine, alcohol and tobacco may provide relief.

 

Depending on a patient's health history, supplements to correct deficiencies in iron, folate and magnesium or medications to reduce RLS symptoms may be prescribed.

 


Sleep Apnea -  

What you need to know

 

Sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder that can be life threatening if left untreated. People with sleep apnea actually stop breathing many times during the night, and partially awaken as they struggle to breathe.

 

The following Frequently Asked Questions cover basic information about sleep apnea symptoms, risks and treatments. For more information, call The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine at 865-380-4021.

 

What are the symptoms of sleep apnea?

Excessive daytime sleepiness, restless sleep, loud snoring and gasping for breath during sleep all could signal sleep apnea. Additional symptoms may include falling asleep during the day, morning headaches, trouble concentrating, irritability, forgetfulness, mood or behavior changes, anxiety and depression.

 

What causes sleep apnea? 
There are two types of sleep apnea. The most common, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), is caused by relaxation of soft tissue in the back of the throat that blocks the passage of air.  The less common central sleep apnea (CSA) is caused by irregularities in the brain’s normal signals to breathe.  Sleep apnea patients often have a combination of both types. 

Why can sleep apnea be life threatening?

 

Since sleep apnea causes excessive daytime sleepiness, potentially deadly consequences could occur when patients drive or operate machinery. Sleep apnea also appears to put individuals at risk for stroke and is associated with coronary heart disease, heart failure, irregular heartbeats, heart attacks and high blood pressure. And since people with sleep apnea feel fatigued, they are less likely to exercise, which can lead to obesity and associated medical issues like diabetes.

How is sleep apnea diagnosed?

 

Diagnosis begins with a thorough examination by the patient's physician. If no underlying medical problem is found to be disturbing sleep, then the specialists at The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine can help. The diagnostic process varies depending on each patient's situation but typically includes an extensive sleep questionnaire covering the patient's personal and medical history. If necessary, a sleep study to collect comprehensive information about sleep and breathing patterns may be conducted in one of the center's private, soundproofed, sleep study bedrooms.


Can sleep apnea be treated?

Yes. The multidisciplinary team at The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine develops a personalized treatment plan for each patient based on comprehensive testing and expert diagnosis. Treatment may include behavioral and dietary counseling, exercise, positive airway pressure such as a CPAP machine, and/or use of an oral splint called  a mandibular repositioning device. Surgery rarely is required.


 


Chronic Insomnia -

What you need to know

 

Insomnia is not a disease, but a condition that is caused by poor or inadequate sleep. Experts estimate that one-third of all American adults experience insomnia at some time during their lives. Chronic insomnia is less common, affecting about 10 percent of adults. People with chronic insomnia have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep atnight for several weeks or months.

 

The following Frequently Asked Questions cover basic information about chronic insomnia symptoms, risks and treatments. For more information, call The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine at 865-380-4021.

 

What are the symptoms of chronic insomnia?

People with chronic insomnia are aware of their condition because they know that they aren't able to get the amount of sleep they want and need. Common symptoms experienced by those with insomnia include:

• problems falling asleep
• difficulty staying asleep and/or waking up too early
• a feeling of not getting enough sleep
• daytime fatigue or sleepiness
• inability to concentrate
• irritability
• anxiety
• depression
• forgetfulness


What causes chronic insomnia? 
While various factors can contribute to chronic insomnia the most common causes are psychological and psychiatric problems. Neurological problems, medications, stress and other underlying medical factors also can cause chronic insomnia.

What health risks are associated with chronic insomnia?

 

Chronic insomnia can contribute to a host of potentially dangerous health problems including high blood pressure, depression, confusion, lethargy and obesity.


Can chronic insomnia be treated?

Yes. The multidisciplinary team at The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine develops a personalized treatment plan for each patient based on comprehensive testing and expert diagnosis. Treatment may include behavioral and dietary counseling, exercise and prescription medications.

 


The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine Staff -

Unique team approach benefits patients

 

At The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine, our unique team approach combines the expertise of neurologists, pulmonologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and other health professionals.

 

By following a thorough and multifaceted process, our team gets to the root of each patient's sleep problem, and addresses any nutritional, physical and behavioral factors related to the quality of sleep.

 

The center's multidisciplinary team includes the following providers who specialize in Sleep Medicine:

 

 

Dr. Fredric M. Radoff, Neurologist

 

Dr. Bruce Roberts, Pulmonologist

 

Claudia Heina, Nurse Practitioner

 

 

Making an Appointment -

Testing available six nights weekly

 

The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine is open Sunday-Friday. Testing is conducted six nights weekly in the center's private, soundproofed, sleep study bedrooms. Each bedroom features a comfortable bed, shower and other amenities.

 

The center diagnoses and treats adults with sleep-related problems and disorders. This includes, but is not limited to, patients with sleep apnea, chronic insomnia, Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) and narcolepsy.

 

For more information or to schedule an initial appointment, call The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine at 865-380-4021.

 

 

Directions -

Conveniently located in Morganton Square

 

The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine is conveniently located off Highway 321 between downtown Maryville and Foothills Mall at 710 Morganton Square Drive.

 


From downtown Maryville:

Follow 321 west to Morganton Square Drive. Turn right onto Morganton Square Drive, then right into The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine parking lot.

 

From Highway 129 (Alcoa Highway Bypass):

Follow the 129 bypass to the intersection with 321 east. Turn left, and follow to Simmons Street. Turn left onto Simmons, left again on Lord Avenue, then make a slight right diagonal to cross onto Morganton Square Drive. The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine parking lot will be on your left.

 

For additional directions or to schedule an initial appointment, call The ETMG Center for Sleep Medicine at 865-380-4021.